Free Read [Self Help Book] ☆ Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - by Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey ✓


  • Title: Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle
  • Author: Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey
  • ISBN: 9780791071687
  • Page: 410
  • Format: None

  • A critical overview of the work features the writings of Terry Southern, William S Doxey, Jerome Klinkowitz, Richard Giannone, John L Simons, James Lundquist, and other scholars After the bomb, Dad came up with ice Terry Southern Vonnegut s Cat s cradle William S Doxey The private person as public figure Jerome Klinkowitz Cat s cradle Richard Giannone TangA critical overview of the work features the writings of Terry Southern, William S Doxey, Jerome Klinkowitz, Richard Giannone, John L Simons, James Lundquist, and other scholars After the bomb, Dad came up with ice Terry Southern Vonnegut s Cat s cradle William S Doxey The private person as public figure Jerome Klinkowitz Cat s cradle Richard Giannone Tangled up in you a playful reading of Cat s cradle John L Simons From formula toward experiment Cat s cradle and God bless you, Mr Rosewater Jerome Klinkowitz Playful genesis and dark revelation in Cat s cradle Leonard Mustazza Bokononism as a structure of ironies Zoltan Ab di Nagy Mother night, Cat s cradle, and The crimes of our time Jerome Klinkowitz Vonnegut s invented religions as sense making systems Peter Freese Icy solitude magic and violence in Macondo and San Lorenzo Wendy B Faris Vonnegut s cosmos David H Goldsmith Cosmic irony James Lundquist Cat s cradle Jonah and the whale Lawrence R Broer Hurting til it laughs the painful comic science fiction stories of Kurt Vonnegut Peter J Reed The paradox of awareness and language in Vonnegut s fiction Loree Rackstraw.
    Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey
    Bloom is a literary critic, and currently a Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University Since the publication of his first book in 1959, Bloom has written than 20 books of literary criticism, several books discussing religion, and one novel He has edited hundreds of anthologies.


    Commentaires:

    Julia Saboya
    In the book “Cats Cradle”, Kurt Vonnegut uses discreet humor, irony and his own made up religion, Bokononism to illustrate how science is both helpful and harming. His writing can be confusing to young readers considering his complex references. I ended the book with the realization that a crazy idea formed by a capable and credited person can have the power to demolish the aspects of life as we look at it.The narrorator of the book, John is in the process of writing a book titled, The Day t [...]

    Mason Wampler
    The book starts with John the main character researching about what Americans where doing when the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan. While researching this topic, John becomes involved with the children of Felix Hoenikker.John travels to Ilium, New York, to interview the Hoenikker children and others for his book. In Ilium John meets, among others, Dr. Asa Breed, who was the supervisor "on paper" of Felix Hoenikker. As the novel continues , John learns of a substance called ice-nine, created by [...]

    Madelaine Cargill
    Kurt Vonnegut is my favorite author, and this book is probably the reason behind that. I share many of the same world views as Vonnegut, and his satirical writing style is one I try to imitate. In Cat's Cradle, Vonnegut brings to light world issues such as religion, science, and politics and ties them into an apocalyptic theme. This idea of an apocalypse, in what form it will happen, and how humans will react to it, is one of my favorite things to read and write about. I feel that Vonnegut does [...]

    Sam
    Cat’s Cradle is a 1963 novella written by acclaimed satirist and author Kurt Vonnegut. Vonnegut, a veteran of the Second World War and researcher at General Electric, drew upon the experiences of horror, monotony, and hope to write many of his works. Cat’s Cradle is what he considered to be his masterpiece: a humorous, nihilistic, and depressing statement about the world and its values during the Cold War. The novella highlights the issues surrounding organized religion and the nuclear Arms [...]

    Mark
    I don not usually LIKE books of criticism, books by critics, or the nature of criticism in general. Sometimes the search for meaning in books like this is inflated by bogus intellectual constructions which have little bearing on the author's meaning. But, of course, all books are different, and this one was actually enjoyable, although there are many instances of the same passages (from Vonnegut) repeated through and through in different essays appearing here.I was "turned on" by Vonnegut in 196 [...]

    Paige
    As usual, Vonnegut has provided a thought-provoking commentary on humanity and a possible avenue of its future. I found his use of religion and discussion of very interesting and thought-provoking in my own life. It caused me to really reflect on why I believe what I do and how that affects my way of life. I think this book is also skilled in addressing and identifying ways that religion functions in society, for better or for worse. I love the way Vonnegut writes: a fictitious story in which on [...]

    Vaibhhav
    One of Vonnegut's early and really brilliant works. I know that when reading it, one might think the author disillusioned, but the construct of using a made-up religion to lampoon the trivial nature of human things is genius. It could stand purely on its honesty and self-effacing humour in that regard. You see the plot through the eyes of an author, and satire spins to black humour to sci-fi, to politics, and finally, raw, relentless humanity.

    Judith Furedi
    I remember it as enjoyable and different and part of my required reading. Vonnegut was a writer-in-residence at my college, for a while, and when I met him, he was totally not who I expected. This was one of the classics, though. I would need to re-read it. And so it goes

    Daisy
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Kayleigh
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Sara-Jayne
    I truly enjoyed this book, and the twists in plot and theme. I am looking forward to reading more from this author.

    Colby
    Interesting take on roles of religion and science and potential for impacting earth. Satire throughout, as told via lens of imaginary island, scientific discovery, and religion. Or is it?

    Hulda
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Coty
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Phyllis
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Lois
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Guy
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Valentine
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Nakia
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Arsene
    My first Vonnegut book. Oh the pleasure of discovering him was unbearable. They don't wrote them. Like this anymore.

    Dayna
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Elva
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Adriel
    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

    Kristen
    ok so is it just me or is Cat's Cradle some sort of fraternal twin to Slaughterhouse Five?? This is only the second Kurt Vonnegut I've read, but I'm sensing a commmon theme here. Both of these novels seem to have their most important purpose be to portray the total insignificance of life and the meaninglessness of every part of it. Depressing, right?Yeah, well Vonnegut (in his special way) manages to make this dark theme come across through satire and a form of comedy which lightens the general [...]

    Jeff Miller
    Having recently re-read Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse 5 and now having re-read Cat's Cradle their similarities come to the forefront as both novel deal with a writer preparing to right a book on a mass slaughter in WWII. In Slaughterhouse 5 the writer is preparing to write a book about the firebombing of Dresden and in Cat's Cradle the writer is writing a book on the scientists families involved in the Manhattan Project. Though Slaughterhouse descends into a book within a book as it subsequently tel [...]

    Travis
    Fact is allegedly stranger than fiction. With the likes of mad scientists, dancing Ukrainian midgets, possessed clarinet players and granfalloons (you have to read the book to understand the last one) Vonnegut captured this concept in his fable of flawed antiheroes and comedic tragedy.We follow the path of a journalist, researching the scientist who invented the a-bomb. Curious about how he must have felt on the day it was dropped on Hiroshima, he pursues the orphaned children of said scientist. [...]

    Kate
    Vonnegut's "Cat's Cradle" is engaging and full of small nuggets of wisdom. Although, perhaps that wisdom is that there is no wisdom, as the entire novel is about how "all of true the things I tell you are shameless lies" (5). I think that this element, the fact that everything is a lie, is what makes Vonnegut's book interesting. Especially after reading a novel that was written with the idea of multiple stories in mind, this idea that everything is a lie is fascinating. It's fascinating because [...]

    Drew
    I really enjoyed reading Cat's Cradle. It took about a week to read, the pages turned faster than any book I've read before. The story seems straight forward enough, following an author as he tries to gather information about the creator of the atom bomb, and suddenly takes a turn towards the apocalypse. The book is filled with religious sayings from the religion of this world, and the one towards the end that is a pretty good summary of the book is this:In the beginning, God created the earth, [...]

    David
    For a long time, I said I wasn't a fan of Vonnegut. Turns out, I just haven't been in the mood to read him since I last read a book by him, which was something like 8 years ago (although I do remember liking that great "Harrison Bergeron" story). Since them, I've grouped Vonnegut with along with the likes of Hunter S. Thompson and Chuck Palahniuk - mildly entertaining writers who find a core fan base with college guys. You know, frat lit. I read Cat's Cradle for a class and found myself rolling [...]

    Allie
    I always love Vonnegut, although. like other reviewers have said, I get the sense that there's something I'm missing as I read. It's the same feeling I got reading The Crying of Lot 49. When you reach the end, you think, "If this is all the book is supposed to mean, then it's sort of a poor excuse for a book." And then you think back on what you read, and it makes you giggle a little, and you think, "Well, even if my conscious brain didn't get it, some part of me did," and you're okay with that. [...]

    • Free Read [Self Help Book] ☆ Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - by Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey ✓
      410 Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Self Help Book] ☆ Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle - by Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey ✓
      Posted by:Harold Bloom Terry Southern David H. Goldsmith James Lundquist Lawrence R. Broer Peter J. Reed Loree Rackstraw William S. Doxey
      Published :2019-09-26T13:51:07+00:00