Best Read [Natalie Angier] ☆ The Beauty of the Beastly || [Music Book] PDF Ê


  • Title: The Beauty of the Beastly
  • Author: Natalie Angier
  • ISBN: 9780395791479
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Paperback

  • Natalie Angier knows all that scientists know and sometimes about the power of symmetry in sexual relations, about the brutal courting habits of dolphins, about the grand deceit of orchids, about the impact of female and male preferences on evolution She knows how scientists go about their work, and she describes their ways, their visions, and their arguments PeNatalie Angier knows all that scientists know and sometimes about the power of symmetry in sexual relations, about the brutal courting habits of dolphins, about the grand deceit of orchids, about the impact of female and male preferences on evolution She knows how scientists go about their work, and she describes their ways, their visions, and their arguments Perhaps most poignantly, she understands the complexities and the sad necessity of death The beauty of the natural world lies in the details, and most of those details are not the stuff of calendar art, she points out Few writers have ever covered so many facets of biology so evocatively in one book The Beauty of the Beastly tells us how the genius of the biological universe resides in its details and proves why, according to Timothy Ferris, author of the acclaimed Coming of Age in the Milky Way, Angier is one of the strongest and wittiest science writers in the world today.
    Natalie Angier
    Natalie Angier is a nonfiction writer and a science journalist for The New York Times.


    Commentaires:

    Malbadeen
    Some of the parts of this book seemed incongruous (either in content or writing style)but it was easy enough to skim what I wasn't interested in and enjoy the parts I was. I don't feel like I've exactly converted to the science side yet, but I did learn some interesting things, for example1. Sheep (and farmers from Australia and New Zealand) are sick perverts, as evidenced by pg.14, " sheep farmers in New Zealand and Australia have long know, they can encourage a ewe to bond normally with a lamb [...]

    Andrew Z
    The Beauty of the Beastlyby Natalie Angier304 PagesFinished 10/17/12This book is a nonfiction book about how living organisms work and why nature chose to give certain traits to certain species. It talks about the behaviors of different animals and shows that even the most grotesque creatures also have a beauty within. In this book, the author goes over some of the most hated(and most well liked)organisms on the planet from thw villanous Hyena to the dangerous Pit Viper. The author then shows ho [...]

    MB (What she read)
    Read this book in concert with Sapolsky's A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons, Zimmer's Parasite Rex : Inside the Bizarre World of Nature's Most Dangerous Creatures, and,--for dessert--Judson's Dr. Tatiana's Sex Advice to All Creation and you will be a very happy reader. Your brain will expand, you will have very many interesting things to think about, and you will never again look at the world in the same way. I dare you.

    Huyen
    How should I call this gem? a feast for my imagination? verbalized Animal Planet? David Attenborough's genius? Natalie Angier is such a charming, witty and imaginative writer that I both envy her and would probably kiss the ground she walks on if I was a guy. The way she anthropomorphizes these animal stories makes it a sheer delight to read and leaves me giggling for hours (how do I draw a smiley face here?). I learn so much random stuff about scorpions, bees, dolphins, hyenas, cockroaches, wor [...]

    Theresa
    Although I read this book from the vantage point of 15+ years in the future I have a hard time overcoming the sheer hubris with which the author wrote these vignettes. Understandably, the 90's were an era when science was really coming into its own as a discipline whose outputs could be made potable to the masses but it is still very difficult to get past the "look at how much we now understand about everything" attitude plastered over every page.Despite this, I do think the author contributed g [...]

    Dale
    Not only did I enjoy this collection of science essays by Angier, but in reading it I came to realize that there is in fact an entire "collection of science essays" genre of books out there; and now that I've read Angier as well as Oliver Sachs and David Quammen and others, I realize I am a pretty big fan of the whole genre. I always thought science as a cool, even as a kid (occasionally entertaining thoughts of growing up to be a astrophysicist and studying wormholes) but years of high school s [...]

    lola
    My mother-in-law is crazy about Natalie Angier and I hope she never reads this because I have never disagreed with her on anything in almost 2.5 years, but I dunno guys, I felt this book was a bunch of evolutionary bio/sociobiological bullshit so 90s that I actually had futurechills from, you know, now. This is written pre-Craig Venter, pre-genome, pre-babies in jars.But I liked the part about parasites! Did you guys know that there are these certain parasites that infect the brains of mice so t [...]

    Christine
    Unfortunately, this book was written in 1994- much has changed in the scientific world in the last 19 years. The introduction explains that each of the chapters was originally a newspaper/journal entry meant to stand alone. As a result, the chapters don't flow well. The same facts and themes (THE HUMAN GENOME WILL SAVE US) repeat throughout the book. Based on the cover and the title, I assumed that the book would be about cockroaches and worms and the nasty creatures of the world. The book does [...]

    Valeria Wicker
    I picked up this book after Angier's WOMAN: An Intimate Geography became one of my favorites the previous year. The author's humor and vivid descriptions of biological topics from DNA transciption and protein translation to animal behavior to evolution brings the understanding of science within reach for the general reader.The book is a collection of articles published in the New York Times in the early- to mid-nineties. My favorite chapters were the one about scorpions (made my skin crawl!), al [...]

    Mitch
    This book is composed of many short articles now adjusted and collected thematically. The author is a scientific journalist with a fascination particularly focussed on the convolutions of evolution. I didn't find some of it very interesting, but since the articles were short, I could move along quickly and there were plenty of interesting bits coming along shortly. Interjected are moments of humor; Natalie is no Mary Roach but she has done her homework and I think she's standing in Ms. Roach's s [...]

    Goge (BARRONS) le Moning Maniac,
    "the power of symmetry in sexual relations, about the brutal courting habits of dolphins, about the grand deceit of orchids, about the impact of female and male preferences on evolution. She knows how scientists go about their work, and she describes their ways, their visions, and their arguments. Perhaps most poignantly, she understands the complexities and the sad necessity of death. "The beauty of the natural world lies in the details, and most of those details are not the stuff of calendar a [...]

    Pamela Mishra
    Natalie Angier has a charming way to write about the the most neglected and not so "cute" wildlife. I especially liked the hyena chapter. i thought it was fascinated. I picked up a copy of this book after reading it from the library.

    Jane
    borrowed this from Alice - thoroughly enjoyed.

    Lori
    Cool science. Gross bugs. Life!

    Sps
    She's always so quotable.

    Jean
    I would put this author on a par with Lewis Thomas as a science writer.Very interesting book about a variety of animals and insects.

    Jennifer
    I need to reread this one, as it doesn't figure as prominently in my memory as Woman and The Canon, but I'm quite sure it was an equally enjoyable gem of science meets wit.

    Biogeek
    Natalie Angier is the New York Times science writer, and she writes with insight and wit and knowledge.

    Kate Hasenbank
    New perspectives on creatures generally regarded as ugly or terrifying.

    Shasta
    I really liked this book, although I could have done without the DNA section (or at least placed it first) and the scientists at work section.

    • Best Read [Natalie Angier] ☆ The Beauty of the Beastly || [Music Book] PDF Ê
      284 Natalie Angier
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Natalie Angier] ☆ The Beauty of the Beastly || [Music Book] PDF Ê
      Posted by:Natalie Angier
      Published :2019-04-20T00:18:52+00:00